21 September 2011

Carpenter's Shoes: Fun with Technorati

I've just visited Technorati for the second time this month. and that's probably also for the second time this year.

This time it was the result of reading Carpenter's Shoes: Fun with Technorati
Technorati provide blog ranking stats (www.technorati.com) It's a bit of a mission to find out the rankings of the South African religion blogs that I am interested in, but there are a few that I check once in a blue moon. Blog rankings are based on what Technorati calls authority.

My previous visit to Technorati this month was because I got an email asking me to take part in a survey on the state of the blogosphere. Though the survey wasn't very satisfactory, if you are a blogger it might well be worth taking part in it, as the more who do so, the better the picture it will give of the state of the blogosphere, despite its flaws.

But Jenny Hillebrand's post on Carpenter's Shoes got me thinking about why I only visit Technorati once or twice a year, if that. A few years ago I used to visit the site three or four times a week.

What has changed?

Well the Technorati site has changed.

Back then it had stuff that interested me as a blogger. I could go there to find blogs and blog posts I was interested in. There used to be "Technorati tags", and one could click on them to find who was blogging on what topics. If I was going to blog on a subject, I'd look up tags related to that subject, and if those blogs said anything interesting on the topic, I'd link to them.

Now, however, you can't find stuff that you find interesting on Technorati. If you look at their tags page, for example, you can't search for tags. They only show you the currently popular tags for the last month. Do not expect Technorati to give you what you like. You WILL like what Technorati gives you and tells you to like. There is a kind of arrogant authoritarian flavour to it.

What is going on here?

I suspect that Technorati was started by a bunch of bloggers who enjoyed blogging and tried to produce a tool that would be useful to bloggers and that bloggers would like. And it grew a bit beyond their capacity and they needed a bit of capital injection to keep it going and growing.

But capital injection also means that the marketing people come in and have more say, and in their philosophy giving bloggers what they are looking for is no good at all. What is important is to steer bloggers towards the stuff that brings in the most advertising revenue for us.

So they modify it, and tell you:

Welcome to the
new Technorati.com

The blogosphere evolves and so do we.

And that means they make it harder to find what you are looking for, and easier to find the stuff that brings in the most advertising revenue for them. And finding what you are looking for, as Jenny says, is "a bit of a mission."

And that is why I now visit Technorati only once or twice a year, instead of three or four times a week.

1 comment:

James Higham said...

Technorati still exists? Gosh, I thought it had died a few years back.


Related Posts with Thumbnails